Roman Sword discovered off Oak Island radically suggests Ancient Mariners visited New World 1,000 years before Columbus

I posted about this a couple of days ago. More here.

Researchers investigating the mysterious Oak Island, located on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada, have made a startling announcement regarding the discovery of a Roman ceremonial sword and what is believed to be a Roman shipwreck, radically suggesting that ancient mariners visited North America more than a thousand years before Columbus.

Evidence of the finding, which was exclusively revealed to Johnston Press and published in The Boston Standard, was uncovered by researchers involved in The History Channel’s series Curse of Oak Island, which details the efforts of two brothers from Michigan as they attempt to solve the mystery of the Oak Island treasure and discover historical artifacts believed to be concealed on the island.

J. Hutton Pulitzer, lead researcher and historic investigator, along with academics from the Ancient Artifact Preservation Society, have compiled a paper on the finding, which is scheduled to be published in full in early 2016.

The Mystery of Oak Island

Oak island is home to one of the biggest treasure hunts in history, which began in in 1795, when 18-year old Daniel McGinnis saw lights coming from the island. Out of curiosity, he went searching for the lights and discovered a clearing on the southeastern end of the island. Within the clearing was a circular depression, and nearby a tackle block hung from a tree. McGinnis and several friends returned to the area and began excavating the depression. A few feet beneath the surface, they discovered a layer of flagstone, and the pit walls had markings from a pick. Approximately every ten feet (3 m) they dug, they found a layer of logs. After excavating to thirty feet beneath the surface, McGinnis and his friends abandoned the excavation without ever finding anything of significance.

Digs and Buildings, Oak Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, August 1931.

Digs and Buildings, Oak Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, August 1931. (Wikimedia Commons)

Reports of the boys’ efforts were published in several printed works. Eight years later, the Onslow Company sailed to the area to try to recover the supposed treasure, that was assumed to lie hidden at the base of the pit. Based on the written accounts of the boys, the Onslow Company attempted an excavation of what was now referred to as the “Money Pit.”  However, they were eventually forced to abandon their efforts due to flooding.

Numerous searches of the pit continued over the next two centuries, but they have been continually plagued with difficulties including collapses and flooding within the pit. The entire island has been searched for treasure, and is continued today by Marty and Rick Lagina, as chronicled on Curse of Oak Island.

Read more: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/roman-sword-discovered-oak-island-radically-suggests-ancient-mariners-020663#ixzz3v3Pd3xLk
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