The truth comes out: Ebola is ‘for life’ Friday, March 11, 2016 by: Daniel Barker Tags: Ebola, long-term effects, neurological damage Facebook (343)Twitter Ebola (NaturalNews) New research appears to confirm what many scientists have suspected – that those who survive the Ebola virus may face serious long-term neurological problems. A study conducted in Liberia by U.S. neurologists has found that most Ebola survivors continue to suffer from neurological damage and other health problems long after they have been declared “Ebola-free.” Scottish survivor admitted to hospital for third time The preliminary results of the study were made public within days of the news that Pauline Cafferkey, a nurse who contracted the disease while volunteering in Sierra Leone, had been admitted to the hospital for a third time since “recovering” from the virus. From The Guardian: “Cafferkey, 40, who returned from working in the Kerry Town Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, run by Save the Children, in December 2014, spent almost a month in isolation in the Royal Free in January 2015. “When she was discharged and returned to her home in Scotland, it was assumed that her problems were over, but last October she again fell ill. She was diagnosed with meningitis, triggered by the Ebola virus lingering in her nervous system. Again she was transferred to the Royal Free, where she came close to death but rallied and returned home.” This time, Cafferkey has been hospitalized “due to a late complication from her previous infection by the Ebola virus,” but is now considered to be in stable condition. Survivors of the virus have reported a number of ongoing symptoms, the most common of which include fatigue, memory loss, headaches, depression and muscle pain. When survivors were examined, many were found to display “abnormal eye movements, tremors and abnormal reflexes.” Another survivor’s story Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/053261_Ebola_long-term_effects_neurological_damage.html#ixzz42hSPA6bl

The truth comes out: Ebola is ‘for life’

Ebola

(NaturalNews) New research appears to confirm what many scientists have suspected – that those who survive the Ebola virus may face serious long-term neurological problems.

A study conducted in Liberia by U.S. neurologists has found that most Ebola survivors continue to suffer from neurological damage and other health problems long after they have been declared “Ebola-free.”

Scottish survivor admitted to hospital for third time

The preliminary results of the study were made public within days of the news that Pauline Cafferkey, a nurse who contracted the disease while volunteering in Sierra Leone, had been admitted to the hospital for a third time since “recovering” from the virus.

From The Guardian:

“Cafferkey, 40, who returned from working in the Kerry Town Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, run by Save the Children, in December 2014, spent almost a month in isolation in the Royal Free in January 2015.

“When she was discharged and returned to her home in Scotland, it was assumed that her problems were over, but last October she again fell ill. She was diagnosed with meningitis, triggered by the Ebola virus lingering in her nervous system. Again she was transferred to the Royal Free, where she came close to death but rallied and returned home.”

This time, Cafferkey has been hospitalized “due to a late complication from her previous infection by the Ebola virus,” but is now considered to be in stable condition.

Survivors of the virus have reported a number of ongoing symptoms, the most common of which include fatigue, memory loss, headaches, depression and muscle pain.

When survivors were examined, many were found to display “abnormal eye movements, tremors and abnormal reflexes.”

Another survivor’s story

Learn more:  http://www.naturalnews.com/053261_Ebola_long-term_effects_neurological_damage.html#ixzz42hSPA6bl

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