Tag Archives: happiness

A neuroscientist says there’s a powerful benefit to exercise that is rarely discussed

Exercise gives ours brains an immediate boost. (Reuters/Will Burgess)

January 13, 2016

When I was about to turn 40, I started working out regularly after years of inactivity. As I sweated my way through cardio, weights, and dance classes, I noticed that exercise wasn’t just changing my body. It was also profoundly transforming my brain—for the better.

The immediate effects of exercise on my mood and thought process proved to be a powerful motivational tool. And as a neuroscientist and workout devotee, I’ve come to believe that these neurological benefits could have profound implications for how we live, learn and age as a society.

Let’s start with one of the most practical immediate benefits of breaking a sweat: exercise combats stress. Exercise is a powerful way to combat feelings of stress because it causes immediate increases in levels of key neurotransmitters, including serotonin, noradrenalin, dopamine and endorphins, that are often depleted by anxiety and depression. That’s why going for a run or spending 30 minutes on the elliptical can boost our moods immediately—combatting the negative feelings we often associate with chronic stressors we deal with every day.

 Exercise improves our ability to shift and focus attention.  In my lab, we have also demonstrated that exercise improves our ability to shift and focus attention. Even casual exercisers will recognize this effect. It’s that heightened sense of focus that you feel right after you’ve gotten your blood flowing, whether it be a brisk walk with the dog or a full-on Crossfit workout. These findings suggest that if you have a big presentation or meeting where you need your focus and attention to be at its peak, you should get in a workout ahead of time to maximize those brain functions.

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The Secrets Of Happy Couples (Infographic)

Everyone’s relationship is different, shaped by the individual needs and desires of the partners involved. But one thing’s for sure: we all want to feel happy and fulfilled — as individuals and as partners in a relationship. Right?

Well, even with these inevitable differences, there are certain things that can help create a steady foundation for a happy relationship. With Valentine’s Day around the corner, we checked in with our friends at Happify who created an infographic detailing different (scientifically proven!) facts and stats about what makes a happy relationship, along with tips to achieve them. Check it out, and get ready to feel the love this Valentine’s Day… and for days to come!

HappifyInfographic

30 Lectures that Will Help You to Become a More Knowledgeable Libertarian

One of the most popular posts, ever, at EPJ is The 30 Day Reading List that will Lead You to Becoming a Knowledgeable Libertarian. It has recently occurred to me that, thanks largely to the Mises Institute, there are many, many videos and audio tapes that can help in educating the student of liberty. Here are my top selections:

1. The State Is Too Dangerous to Tolerate by Robert Higgs

2. Banking and the Business Cycle by Murray Rothbard

3.The Myth of National Defense by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

4. Everything You Love You Owe to Capitalism by Lew Rockwell

5. The Austrians on Fascism: Hayek, Mises, and Roepke by David Gordon

6. The U.S. of Totalitarianism -Lew Rockwell interviews Doug Casey

7. The Privatization of Roads and Highways by Walter Block

8. The World at War by Ralph Raico

9. Economic Reasoning: The Most Common Fallacies by David Gordon

10.  Marxist and Austrian Class Analysis by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

11. Economics of Risk and Insurance  by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

12. The Role of Freedom in Economic Well Being: A Look at Evidence by Walter Block

13. 2+2 = 4 by Robert Wenzel

14. The Mises and Hayek Critiques of Modern Political State by Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn

15. Murray N. Rothbard: Go Thou and Do Likewise by Gary North

16. Inflation During the Civil War by Mark Thornton

17. Chicago Economics v. Austrian Economics by Murray Rothbard

18. Weaponized Keynesians -Lew Rockwell interviews Joe Salerno

19. Death by Politician by Yuri Maltsev

20. America’s Slow-Motion Fascist Coup -Lew Rockwell interviews Naomi Wolf

21. Lost Treasures in ‘Human Action’ by  Hans-Hermann Hoppe

22. Public Service Is an Ignoble Calling by Robert Higgs

23.The Meaning of Ludwig von Mises by Murray Rothbard

24. The Fed and the Power Eilte by Murray Rothbard

25. How Empires Bamboozle the Bourgeoisie by Lew Rockwell

26. Keynes and His Influence by Gary North

27. Time Preference, Capital, Technology, and Economic Growth by  Hans-Hermann Hoppe

28. Political Entrepreneurship and the Economics of Wealth Destruction by Thomas J. DiLorenzo

29. Did Keynesian Economics Win the Battle of Ideas? by Peter G. Klein

30. Mr. Libertarian, Murray N. Rothbard  by Jeff Riggenbach

For day31: The Good Life of Murray N. Rothbard  by JoAnn Rothbard

Emotional health in childhood ‘is the key to future happiness’

 Most happiness “studies” these days are about selling government control of your life and enjoying low income levels. The two thing that I’ve always said make a happy grown-up are the freedom to control your own life. To do this successfully you need an emotionally satisfying childhood keep you focused on happiness not material things or weird perversions.
Lord Richard Layard, who is emeritus professor of economics at the LSE.
 Lord Richard Layard, who is emeritus professor of economics at the LSE. Photograph: Linda Nylind/Observer

LSE study says money, success and good grades are less important

After investigating the factors in a person’s life that can best predict whether they will lead satisfied lives, a team headed by one of the UK’s foremost “happiness” experts, Professor Richard Layard, has come up with an answer that may prove controversial.

Layard and his colleagues at the Wellbeing research programme at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance conclude that a child’s emotional health is far more important to their satisfaction levels as an adult than other factors, such as if they achieve academic success when young, or wealth when older. The authors explain that evaluating the quality of a child’s emotional health is based on analysing a range of internal factors in a person’s early life, including whether they endured unhappiness, sleeplessness, eating disorders, bedwetting, fearfulness or tiredness.

The academics claim that their study, What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-course Model of Well-being, published in the latest edition of the Economic Journal, offers “a completely new perspective on which factors contribute most to a satisfying life”. The study claims to challenge “the basic assumption of educational policy in recent years – that academic achievement matters more than anything else”. This claim appears to be an implicit criticism of former education secretary Michael Gove, who instructed schools not to focus on “peripheral” issues such as children’s moral, social and cultural development in favour of academic excellence. Gove’s successor, Nicky Morgan, has pledged to reverse this approach.

Layard and his team analysed data from about 9,000 people who were born over a three-week period in 1970 and then tracked by the British Cohort Survey, a study that asks them to complete an extensive questionnaire about their lives every five to seven years. They were also asked to rate their satisfaction at key periods through their lives. The team then examined factors including their income, educational achievement, employment, whether they had been in trouble with the law, whether they were single, as well as their physical and emotional health – to gauge how significant these were in determining satisfaction. In addition, a range of factors that affect a child’s development – for example, intellectual performance, family socio-economic background and emotional health were also examined.

Many people have assumed income is the most important factor in an adult’s life satisfaction. But the academics say their data makes clear this is far less important than emotional health – both in a child and in an adult. “Income only explains about 1% of the variation in life satisfaction among people in the UK – one sixth of the fraction explained by emotional health,” they note. Or, to put it another way, money really cannot buy you happiness.

The findings are controversial. As one of Layard’s colleagues, Andew E Clark, notes in an accompanying paper, the suggestion that “education and income are among the least important determinants of adult success, as measured by life satisfaction … risks provoking outrage among some.”

But the economics of happiness or wellbeing is now a growing and respected discipline within economics that is starting to influence politicians.

David Cameron has stated: “It’s time we admitted that there’s more to life than money and it’s time we focused not just on GDP but on GWB – general well-being.”

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/nov/08/happiness-childhood-emotional-health-richard-layard?CMP=share_btn_fb

10 CHOICES YOU WILL REGRET IN TEN YEARS MAY 29, 2014 CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR

This is a little superficial but still a good read.

1.  Wearing a mask to impress others.
If the face you always show the world is a mask, someday there will be nothing beneath it.  Because when you spend too much time concentrating on everyone else’s perception of you, or who everyone else wants you to be, you eventually forget who you really are.  So don’t fear the judgments of others; you know in your heart who you are and what’s true to you.  You don’t have to be perfect to impress and inspire people.  Let them be impressed and inspired by how you deal with your imperfections.

2. Letting someone else create your dreams for you.

The greatest challenge in life is discovering who you are; the second greatest is being happy with what you find.  A big part of this is your decision to stay true toyour own goals and dreams.  Do you have people who disagree with you?  Good.  It means you’re standing your ground and walking your own path.  Sometimes you’ll do things considered crazy by others, but when you catch yourself excitedly losing track of time, that’s when you’ll know you’re doing the right thing.

3. Keeping negative company.

Don’t let someone who has a bad attitude give it to you.  Don’t let them get to you.  They can’t pull the trigger if you don’t hand them the gun.  When you remember that keeping the company of negative people is a choice, instead of an obligation, you free yourself to keep the company of compassion instead of anger, generosity instead of greed, and patience instead of anxiety.

4. Being selfish and egotistical.

A life filled with loving deeds and good character is the best tombstone.  Those who you inspired and shared your love with will remember how you made them feel long after your time has expired.  So carve your name on hearts, not stone.  What you have done for yourself alone dies with you; what you have done for others and the world remains.

5. Avoiding change and growth.

If you want to know your past look into your present conditions.  If you want to know your future look into your present actions.  You must let go of the old to make way for the new; the old way is gone, never to come back.  If you acknowledge this right now and take steps to address it, you will position yourself for lasting success. Read The Power of Habit.

6. Giving up when the going gets tough.

There are no failures, just results.  Even if things don’t unfold the way you had expected, don’t be disheartened or give up.  Learn what you can and move on.  The one who continues to advance one step at a time will win in the end.  Because the battle is always won far away and long before the final victory.  It’s a process that occurs with small steps, decisions, and actions that gradually build upon each other and eventually lead to that glorious moment of triumph.

7. Trying to micromanage every little thing.

Life should be touched, not strangled.  Sometimes you’ve got to relax and let life happen without incessant worry and micromanagement.  Learn to let go a little before you squeeze too tight.  Take a deep breath.  When the dust settles and you can once again see the forest for the trees, take the next step forward.  You don’t have to know exactly where you’re going to be headed somewhere great.  Everything in life is in perfect order whether you understand it yet or not.  It just takes some time to connect all the dots.

8. Settling for less than you deserve.

Be strong enough to let go and wise enough to wait for what you deserve.  Sometimes you have to get knocked down lower than you have ever been to stand up taller than you ever were before.  Sometimes your eyes need to be washed by your tears so you can see the possibilities in front of you with a clearer vision again.  Don’t settle.

9. Endlessly waiting until tomorrow.

– The trouble is, you always think you have more time than you do.  But one day you will wake up and there won’t be any more time to work on the things you’ve always wanted to do.  And at that point you either will have achieved the goals you set for yourself, or you will have a list of excuses for why you haven’t.

10. Being lazy and wishy-washy.

– The world doesn’t owe you anything, you owe the world something.  So stop daydreaming and start DOING.  Develop a backbone, not a wishbone.  Take full responsibility for your life – take control.  You are important and you are needed.  It’s too late to sit around and wait for somebody to do something someday.  Someday is now; the somebody the world needs is YOU.

http://thespiritscience.net/2014/05/29/10-choices-you-will-regret-in-ten-years/

7 Easy Ways to Improve Your Life in the Next 60 Days

feeling better

7 Easy Ways to Improve Your Life in the Next 60 Days

  1. Be in love. Express and receive love every day. If you’re not in a relationship, Pets can help when human love isn’t available. The exception for people and pets is cats and women. This is generally not a loving combination. A pet that requires more attention is necessary for non-narcissistic love.
  2. Avoid prolonged exposure to stress. Stress is very harmful to our health but it is also a required feeling when a person grows and challenges him or herself to be better. After a stressful experience exercise can help relieve the physical and emotional residue of stress
  3. Find beauty every day. Listening or looking at beauty every day is not only a stress reliever it focuses your life around happiness, not the consumerism and sex that popular culture pushes down our throats.
  4. High intensity training with weight is an easy way to build your immune system. 5-10 minutes a day will change you body after a few months. Your immune system, cardio vascular system and mental state will improve dramatically.
  5. Be outside, in the sun if possible every day. Walk barefoot out side. Feel nature’s energy going into your body and nourishing light feeding your skin.
  6. Having a blend of social and private time allows for internal growth and satisfaction. Healthy relationships allow for free expression and interchange of ideas. Private time to think about your life goals and values; introspection about the current state of your happiness can help avoid “mid life crises”. Finding out who you are by withdrawing from the popular culture will change your outlook on the world.
  7. Eat whole and real foods. Avoid processed foods and drinks. Try to eat raw vegetables at least twice a day. Try to buy organic or grow as much of your own food as possible. Make your own butter, preserve your over productive garden by fermenting, freezing or drying for future use. Eat wild food that you caught or killed.

Be mentally, physically and emotionally engaged every day.