Tag Archives: morality

The Eugenics Plot of the Minimum Wage

In his “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” Martin Luther King Jr. identifies the government as the enemy of the rights and dignity of blacks. He was locked up for marching without a permit. King cites the injustices of the police and courts in particular. And he inspired a movement to raise public consciousness against state brutality, especially as it involved fire hoses, billy clubs, and jail cells.

Less obvious, however, had been the role of a more covert means of subjugation — forms of state coercion deeply embedded in the law and history of the United States. And they were offered as policies grounded in science and the scientific management of society.

Consider the minimum wage. How much does racism have to do with it? Far more than most people realize. A careful look at its history shows that the minimum wage was originally conceived as part of a eugenics strategy — an attempt to engineer a master race through public policy designed to cleanse the citizenry of undesirables. To that end, the state would have to bring about the isolation, sterilization, and extermination of nonprivileged populations.

The eugenics movement, as an application of the principle of the “planned society,” was deeply hostile to free markets.The eugenics movement — almost universally supported by the scholarly and popular press in the first decades of the 20th century — came about as a reaction to the dramatic demographic changes of the latter part of the 19th century. Incomes rose and lifetimes had expanded like never before in history. Such gains applied to all races and classes. Infant mortality collapsed. All of this was due to a massive expansion of markets, technology, and trade, and it changed the world. It meant a dramatic expansion of population among all groups. The great unwashed masses were living longer and reproducing faster.

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THE MORALITY OF LIBERTARIANISM

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THE MORALITY OF LIBERTARIANISM

by  January 15, 2016

Libertarianism is a political philosophy that says that people should be free from government interference to live their life any way they desire and engage in any economic activity they choose as long as their actions are peaceful and consensual and they don’t violate the personal or property rights of others. It is that simple. Violence is justified only in defense of person or property against violence. Nonaggression — that is the libertarian creed. And that is the essence of libertarianism. One’s lifestyle has nothing to do with it.

Liberal and conservative smears of libertarianism are legion. Libertarians are said to be naive, utopian, idealistic, materialistic, and nihilistic. They disdain religion and reject tradition. They are disciples of Rousseau. They are too individualistic. They have nostalgia for a fictional past. They have no compassion for the poor. They don’t believe in social justice. They are weak on national security. They are pacifists and isolationists. Libertarianism aspires, like Marxism, to reduce social life to economics. It treats children like adults. It believes that man is inherently good. “Libertarianism,” according to conservative Jonah Goldberg, “is an ideology best suited for young folks. It compellingly tells kids everything they want to be told.” Libertarians “fetishize change, assuming it to be always and everywhere good.”

But above all, liberals and conservatives like to characterize libertarians as libertines and hedonists who celebrate alternative life-styles and don’t believe in moral principles or absolutes. The trump card they play has two sides: libertarians are all moral relativists and libertarianism is immoral.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

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30 Lectures that Will Help You to Become a More Knowledgeable Libertarian

One of the most popular posts, ever, at EPJ is The 30 Day Reading List that will Lead You to Becoming a Knowledgeable Libertarian. It has recently occurred to me that, thanks largely to the Mises Institute, there are many, many videos and audio tapes that can help in educating the student of liberty. Here are my top selections:

1. The State Is Too Dangerous to Tolerate by Robert Higgs

2. Banking and the Business Cycle by Murray Rothbard

3.The Myth of National Defense by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

4. Everything You Love You Owe to Capitalism by Lew Rockwell

5. The Austrians on Fascism: Hayek, Mises, and Roepke by David Gordon

6. The U.S. of Totalitarianism -Lew Rockwell interviews Doug Casey

7. The Privatization of Roads and Highways by Walter Block

8. The World at War by Ralph Raico

9. Economic Reasoning: The Most Common Fallacies by David Gordon

10.  Marxist and Austrian Class Analysis by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

11. Economics of Risk and Insurance  by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

12. The Role of Freedom in Economic Well Being: A Look at Evidence by Walter Block

13. 2+2 = 4 by Robert Wenzel

14. The Mises and Hayek Critiques of Modern Political State by Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn

15. Murray N. Rothbard: Go Thou and Do Likewise by Gary North

16. Inflation During the Civil War by Mark Thornton

17. Chicago Economics v. Austrian Economics by Murray Rothbard

18. Weaponized Keynesians -Lew Rockwell interviews Joe Salerno

19. Death by Politician by Yuri Maltsev

20. America’s Slow-Motion Fascist Coup -Lew Rockwell interviews Naomi Wolf

21. Lost Treasures in ‘Human Action’ by  Hans-Hermann Hoppe

22. Public Service Is an Ignoble Calling by Robert Higgs

23.The Meaning of Ludwig von Mises by Murray Rothbard

24. The Fed and the Power Eilte by Murray Rothbard

25. How Empires Bamboozle the Bourgeoisie by Lew Rockwell

26. Keynes and His Influence by Gary North

27. Time Preference, Capital, Technology, and Economic Growth by  Hans-Hermann Hoppe

28. Political Entrepreneurship and the Economics of Wealth Destruction by Thomas J. DiLorenzo

29. Did Keynesian Economics Win the Battle of Ideas? by Peter G. Klein

30. Mr. Libertarian, Murray N. Rothbard  by Jeff Riggenbach

For day31: The Good Life of Murray N. Rothbard  by JoAnn Rothbard